In Defense of – Reprinting the M10 Duals in M12

http://wp.me/p5VSx-1ek

Editor’s Note: New column (like always). Sometimes when WotC does some that confuses or upsets a group of people with the choices that they’ve made, I’ll step in and defend WotC’s actions. Now, I don’t agree with all of their choices either, but I will defend the ones I think are right.

Yeah, I was disappointed too.

I mean, Wizards has so many dual lands to choose from to make this cycle of cards better. They could’ve at least printed the Ravnica Duals, which would be awesome with the Zendikar Fetchlands. Or maybe create even new dual lands that we would have more incentive to buy this Core Set.

But this? We’ve seen this cycle three times now. I’ve got playsets of each and when I open my M12 boosters I really don’t want to be staring down at these guys again. The lands are not all that great for Commander, but it’s not even that. You have to keep surprising players or they get restless. We’ve seen this, time to move on.

Let me come to the M10 Duals’ defense: They had to be reprinted.

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You Can’t Always Get What You Want: The Lack of a Decktype

Oh no, my Angels!

Rosterbation is a term that I learned from the great Seattle Mariner’s blog USSMariner (couldn’t find it’s true origin). When talking about dream lineups and rotations and trading players the term gets thrown around a lot in comments and forums (as well as the verb “Stop Rosterbating”). The ability to make the dream roster using whatever players there are in the game is something that passes through the mind of almost any sports fan and engages in great conversations. It’s not a bad thing, and in fact can be a healthy from time to time.

Magic has it’s own semi-related term: “Magical Christmasland” as coined by Brian David-Marshall (@Top8Games) (or Michael Jacob). It presents what the best situation is to get the most explosive opening hand draw. If your deck worked exactly like this every time it would be unstoppable. Of course, with Magic there is randomization and the very real possibility that you may never get a hand like that. When players are looking at new cards for the first time, it’s always the Magical Christmasland situation that gets people up in arms about how good a card actually is. It’s the hope that drives people to play those decks for the one time it does work.

Rosterbation is about what you would love to have but can’t get for a set of something while Magical Christmasland is the order that you would prefer it to be. There is cross-over in both areas: In baseball you want your lead-off guys to get on and your 3 & 4 hitters to drive them home (Magical Christmasland).

Today I’m going to talk about the other side: rosterbation for Magic. No, it’s not about acquiring cards that you need to build a deck, but having access to the cards needed to build it. Confused? Well answer me this: can you build a reanimator deck in Standard at this current time: (SHA, CON, REB, M10, ZEN, WWK)?

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Too Rare or Not Too Rare, That is the Question

Alas poor Darksteel, I knew him Horatio...

Alas, poor Darksteel! I knew him, Horatio...

As begin the second block with the Mythic Rarity included into the game of Magic, it’s time to take a look and see how’s it been so far and how’s it going into Zendikar block. It’s been a source of controversy and a source of tension between developers and players.

MaRo first announced the Mythic rarity June 02, 2008. What most players remember is this quote:

This now leads us to the next question: How are cards split between rare and mythic rare? Or more to the point, what kind of cards are going to become mythic rares? We want the flavor of mythic rare to be something that feels very special and unique. Generally speaking we expect that to mean cards like Planeswalkers, most legends, and epic-feeling creatures and spells. They will not just be a list of each set’s most powerful tournament-level cards.

And from Aaron Forsythe’s Twitter account in the past few weeks here:

My definition of mythic rare: cards that are jaw-dropping to some part of the audience.

And here:

The mythic definition should be broad, not “planeswalkers + cards that aren’t very good.”

By taking these two definitions (Epic-feeling creatures/spells, non-staples/most powerful tournament, jaw-dropping), let’s take a look back at what’s been printed so far and how they fair to these definitions. But to make one more definition of our own: What is a staple card? Cards that are staples can be used in a variety of decks, not a very narrow deck that is very good. Staple cards include: Cryptic Command, Tarmogoyf, Bitterblossom, Reflecting Pool. Non-staple cards are Mistblind Clique, Doran the Siege Tower, Arcbound Ravager. Continue reading

Monthly Mailbag – Slivers, Why Does It Always Have to Be Slivers?

Indiana Jones Slivers

Ah, the mailbag. It’s where a writer goes when he/she runs out of ideas or wants to talk about a variety of topics without putting a small post out. Today, I talk about my “favorite” creature type, why Wizards needs to slow it down, and card drawing in colors other then Blue. Time to use this thinly veiled concept.

Yo,

I like slivers. You’re bashing them on MTGSalvation for their new promo set: Premium Deck Series: Slivers? What gives?

In case you haven’t heard, Wizards is printing another special set (more about this in a moment), this time with Slivers. The new collection, called Premium Deck Series, are going to be all foil (premium is what Wizards calls foils) with some new slivers that have yet to be in the new-border and a Mythic sliver. What’s my beef? Continue reading